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Butcher Innovation Awards

The Butcher Innovation Awards program grew out of the Butcher seed grant program for faculty, which began in 2002 and was supported by a generous gift from Jane and Charlie Butcher. These seed grants resulted in more than 120 scientific publications and produced data that helped CU faculty receive more than $26.2 million in new grants.

The Goals of the Butcher Innovation Award Program

The primary goals of the Butcher Innovation Awards for PhD students and postdoctoral scholars are to encourage scientific creativity by supporting:

  • Excellent interdisciplinary bioscience and engineering, especially within the broad area of quantitative biology
  • Independent research, translational and communication projects designed and proposed by CU PhD students and postdocs
  • New collaborations between people from different fields who have not published together before

 

This 2016 seed grant award winners were:

  • Joshua Wheeler, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry – CU-Boulder and Thomas Vogler, Department of Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology – CU-Boulder  for “Targeting RNA-protein aggregates in iPSC-derived muscle” (Generously supported by NSF IGERT grant number 1144807)
  • Jonathan Rubin, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry – CU-Boulder and Joseph Azofeifa, Department of Computer Science – CU-Boulder for “Determining Gene Networks affected by Chemotherapeutics” (Generously supported by NSF IGERT grant number 1144807)
  • Patrick Barbour, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry – CU-Boulder and Jessica Podoll, Department of Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology – CU-Boulder for “Visualizing virulence: developing fluorescent probes of siderophore dynamics” (Generously supported by NSF IGERT grant number 1144807)
  • Melanie Blevins, Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Genetics – UC-Denver and Nara Chon, Department of Chemistry – UC-Denver for “Combined experimental and computational design of potent peptide inhibitors of the CtBP1 transcription factor complex” (Generously supported by funds provided by Chancellor Elliman at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus)
  • Jeffrey Moore, Department of Physics – CU-Boulder and Cassi Estrem, Department of Cellular and Developmental Biology – UC-Denver for “How does the motor protein dynein position the mitotic spindle” (Generously supported by funds provided by Chancellor Elliman at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus)
  • Xingeng Wang, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry – CU-Boulder and Daniel Gulbranson, Department of Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology – CU-Boulder for “Development of Bivalent Inhibitors Targeting the Interaction of HIV with the Co-receptor CCR5” (Generously supported by funds provided by Chancellor Elliman at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus)

 

Award Information

  • Awards up to a maximum of $10,000 each.
  • Graduate students and postdoctoral researchers with primary appointments at CU wer eligible to be Lead Investigators, Co-Investigators, and listed as Other Collaborators. Non-PhD seeking graduate students could be listed as Co-Investigators or Other Collaborators. Undergraduate students could be listed as Other Collaborators.
  • Faculty were not eligible to apply in any of these categories, but could be listed as an advisor to the project if appropriate.
  • The Co-Investigator had to be from a different department than the Lead Investigator, with no previous publication history together.
  • Applicants were asked to classify their proposal as research, translational or communications.
  • Only one proposal could be submitted per Lead Investigator and Co-Investigator. Other Collaborators could be listed on more than one proposal.
  • To be eligible, the Lead Investigator and Co-Investigator had to register for, and present a poster at, the Butcher Symposium on November 6, 2015at the Westminster Westin Hotel.
  • Three of the awards were awarded to graduate student-led teams proposing research or translational projects within the field of interdisciplinary quantitative biology, from a department or lab participating in the IQ Biology program.
  • Up to two of the awards (maximum budget of $8,000 each), could be given to projects focused on multimedia-based communication of their research to the public. These awards would have been given to graduate student-led teams in the area of quantitative biology, from a department or lab participating in the IQ Biology program. No communication projects were submitted for this awards cycle.
  • There is a one-year award period; Funds are available on June 1, 2016 and can be spent through May 31, 2017.
  • All proposals were peer reviewed by a panel of faculty, postdocs and students. No member of the review panel was eligible for these awards.
  • Responses to the applications were “funded,” “not funded,” or “not eligible.” No narrative reviews were provided, and no appeals of the peer review panel decisions are possible.
  • Awardees will be expected to help review the next round of applications resulting from the 2017 Butcher Symposium.