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Nobel laureate Tom Cech wins 2017 Hazel Barnes Prize

Nobel laureate Tom Cech wins 2017 Hazel Barnes Prize

Nobel laureate Tom Cech wins 2017 Hazel Barnes Prize

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The possibilities and limits of using data to predict scientific discoveries

The possibilities and limits of using data to predict scientific discoveries

Amidst the vast and varied ecosystem of modern science, the emerging interdisciplinary field known as the “science of science” is exploring a difficult, but provocative, question: In the age of data science, are future discoveries now predictable?

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New broad-spectrum antiviral protein can inhibit HIV, other pathogens in some primates

New broad-spectrum antiviral protein can inhibit HIV, other pathogens in some primates

University of Colorado Boulder researchers discovered that a protein-coding gene called Schlafen11 (SLFN11) may induce a broad-spectrum cellular response against infection by viruses including HIV-1. The new research, which was recently published in the journal PLOS Pathogens, found that SLFN11's antiviral potency is highest in non-human primate species such as chimpanzees and orangutans, but less effective in humans and gorillas, indicating that the gene's effects have become highly species-specific over time when it comes to fighting off HIV-1.

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BioFrontiers postdoctoral fellow first Coloradan to receive prestigious award

BioFrontiers postdoctoral fellow first Coloradan to receive prestigious award

The 33-year-old, Berlin-born scientist developed a method using the CRISPR genome editing tool to attach fluorescent tags to telomerase enzymes and telomeres. Then he used a high-powered microscope to spy on their movements inside the nuclei of living human cancer cells. Schmidt received the prestigious Damon Runyan-Dale Frey Breakthrough Award for cancer research and aims to use the $100,000 award to further his groundbreaking research exploring precisely how the telomerase enzyme finds, attaches itself to and replenishes telomeres.

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$1.1 million grant funds CU Boulder research into next-generation vaccines

$1.1 million grant funds CU Boulder research into next-generation vaccines

The University of Colorado Boulder has received a $1.1 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to develop next-generation vaccines that require no refrigeration and defend against infectious diseases with just one shot. If successful, those advancements could radically transform the difficult task of dispensing life-saving immunizations in developing countries — and improve convenience in every part of the world.

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Scientist develops a new way to look at a cellular shapeshifter

Scientist develops a new way to look at a cellular shapeshifter

Tubulin, a protein found in your cells, quietly lends itself to many life processes. It sorts itself into long chains, forming tubes that provide scaffolding for living cells. A versatile shapeshifter, tubulin can arrange itself into different structures during different types of cell behavior. Tubulin gained prominence for medical applications when Taxol, a chemical first found in the bark of the Pacific Yew tree, was developed as a treatment for ovarian, breast and lung cancers. Taxol binds to tubulin and makes it hard for the tubes to grow and shrink, preventing cancer cells from proliferating. “Tubulin is one molecule that does many things in cells,” says Assistant Professor of Physics, Loren Hough, a member of the BioFrontiers Institute. “We're trying to understand how tubulin can play so many different roles."

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CU Competes in International Genetically Engineered Machine Competition

CU Competes in International Genetically Engineered Machine Competition

The International Genetically Engineered Machine competition, or iGEM, is an annual synthetic biology competition that pits teams from schools from all over the world against each other with the goal of winning one of many possible awards. CU Boulder has been a participant for the last couple years, 2015 being no different.

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IQ Biology Blog: SIAM Life Sciences Conference in Boston

IQ Biology Blog: SIAM Life Sciences Conference in Boston

This July I attended the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) Conference on the Life Sciences in Boston. It was four days long, packed with talks, poster sessions, and unnecessary amounts of coffee. At the conference, I presented a poster on my latest research examining a molecular mechanism that is associated with aging in C. elegans. There were eight other graduate students from CU Boulder who gave presentations on topics, such as, biofilm dynamics, bacterial flocculation, wound healing, and disease outbreaks.

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Yeast gene rapidly evolves to attack viruses

Yeast gene rapidly evolves to attack viruses

Humans have used Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast in baking, brewing and winemaking for millennia. New research from the University of Idaho and the University of Colorado Boulder reveals another way that yeast species can help our species: by demonstrating how viruses interact with their hosts, and how hosts may evolve to fight back.

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Kralj NIH Innovation Award

Kralj NIH Innovation Award

Kralj recently won a New Innovator Award from the National Institutes of Health for his work on voltage in neurons. According to the NIH, the New Innovator Award supports “unusually innovative research” from young investigators like Kralj. The NIH does not award these grants easily, giving out only about 50 per year. The program is meant to support creative researchers doing high risk, high-impact science—a description that Kralj easily matches

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Advocating for Science Symposium: Exploring the Changing Landscape of the Scientific Enterprise

Advocating for Science Symposium: Exploring the Changing Landscape of the Scientific Enterprise

Biochemistry postdoc Tess Eidem shares her experience and resources after attending the Advocating for Science Symposium at MIT.

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IQ Biology Blog: My experience with Evolution

IQ Biology Blog: My experience with Evolution

April Goebl is a graduate student in the IQ Biology PhD certificate program at the BioFrontiers Institute.

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Live Cells reveal cancer process

Live Cells reveal cancer process

Telomerase, a powerful enzyme found at the ends of chromosomes, can keep humans healthy, or promote cancer growth. Researchers at the University of Colorado in Boulder used a process called single-molecule imaging to look into the complicated processes that this enzyme uses to attach itself to the ends of chromosomes. This new understanding could help researchers develop better diagnostics and drugs for treating cancer and other diseases.

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Continuing a bioscience legacy at CU Boulder

Continuing a bioscience legacy at CU Boulder

The University of Colorado’s BioFrontiers Institute recently received a $1 million gift from John F. and Kathryn Bradford-Milligan of Hillsborough, California. Their gift will establish the Olke C. Uhlenbeck Endowed Graduate Fund for graduate students participating in the BioFrontiers Interdisciplinary Quantitative Biology, or IQ Biology, PhD program.

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Five Questions about Network Science

Five Questions about Network Science

Aaron Clauset is an assistant professor of computer science at CU-Boulder and a faculty member of the BioFrontiers Institute. He recently accepted the 2016 Erdős-Rényi Prize in Network Science, which is an international prize awarded annually to a researcher under 40 who has made fundamental contributions to the advancement of network science.

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BioFrontiers' Aaron Clauset wins award for network science

BioFrontiers' Aaron Clauset wins award for network science

Aaron Clauset is an assistant professor of computer science at CU-Boulder and a faculty member of the BioFrontiers Institute. He recently accepted the 2016 Erdős-Rényi Prize in Network Science, which is an international prize awarded annually to a researcher under 40 who has made fundamental contributions to the advancement of network science.

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Tracking malaria's evolution

Tracking malaria's evolution

BioFrontiers’ Aaron Clauset, an assistant professor of computer science, was part of a team that analyzed genetic data from apes and found that the genetic strategy used by the parasites that cause a malaria infection is the same, whether the disease is in humans or other primates.

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BioFrontiers seeks its next interdisciplinary faculty member

BioFrontiers seeks its next interdisciplinary faculty member

The BioFrontiers Institute at the University of Colorado at Boulder invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position. Applicants in the area of chemical biology are particularly encouraged to apply.

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Using evolution to fight disease

Using evolution to fight disease

Ebola comes from bats, HIV from primates, and new strains of influenza from birds and pigs. With zoonotic diseases – those capable of transmission from animals to humans – grabbing headlines across the globe, understanding how they work has never been more important. That’s the mission of a new team of researchers led by Dr. Sara Sawyer at the BioFrontiers Institute. By analyzing the genomes of hosts and viruses alike, Sawyer and her team hope to shed some light on why humans are resistant to most animal viruses, and how animal viruses evolve the ability to overcome these obstacles and infect humans.

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